Four Eyes.

imageWhoa, it’s been a a while since I’ve posted. This is probably for two reasons; one, my training schedule has gotten busier exponentially and secondly, I hate writing just for sake of creating a post. I always want what I write to have meaning. I could blather on into a monologue about the sanctity of the written word, but I’ll spare you. My point is that I am writing because something has caught my interest.
This past week, I started wearing my glasses again. This relatively simple choice is unremarkable except for the fact that I didn’t do it sooner and that I was seeing the world in HD again. The interesting part was how it affected other people.
The behavior of strangers around me has changed completely and this past week since I’ve been wearing my glasses. I still carry my cane and wear the same clothing. I’ve hardly changed anything at all, yet my interactions have been so different. The same strangers that I’ve passed walking back-and-forth to the training center each day now say hello or good morning more often than not. People don’t try to help me by explaining where things are anymore, people don’t scramble out of the way if they notice me and people haven’t opened doors. It’s incredible to me that such a little change can cause such a drastic difference. Nothing about my ability level for my disability had changed; simply the judge,net that others were making.
The “moral to the story” so to speak is this; life does not work in clean lines or straight edges. Disabilities are no exception to this rule. Blindness is not work in absolutes. Just because glasses help an individual does not mean that their disability is not significant. If someone is using a cane, it is safe to assume that there is a good reason. Please remember that blindness is a spectrum disability with thousands of different scenarios. It often blurs the lines of what we know and what we fear; the possibility of being blind.